About Us

The Start,

End and

Revival

of the 

Original

Original

Hot dog

The Birth of the Modern American Frankfurter

It all started in 1867. Charles Feltman, a German butcher and baker, brought his frankfurter recipe to Coney Island and began selling them from a pie cart along the boardwalk.

The Birth of the Modern American Frankfurter

It all started in 1867. Charles Feltman, a German butcher and baker, brought his frankfurter recipe to Coney Island and began selling them from a pie cart along the boardwalk.

1867
The first hot dog on a bun

Looking for a way to avoid the cost of plates and cutlery, Charles baked a long bun upon which he could serve the frankfurter. Dubbed a “Coney Island Red Hot,” the first hand-held hot dog 
was born.

More than just a pushcart

By the 1920s, Charles had built Feltman’s Ocean Pavilion. It covered a full city block and had nine restaurants, an amusement park, outdoor movie theater, hotel and more. It was considered the world’s largest restaurant at the time, serving more than five million customers a year. Hot dogs were still a feature on the menu, however, and he was selling 40,000 a day.

1920s
A New Competitor on the Boardwalk

Now this is where it gets interesting. Nathan Handwerker was an employee at Feltman’s, slicing buns and running hot dogs, until 1916 when he decided to start his own hot dog shop on Coney Island – known then and now as Nathan’s Famous. Today, they claim to be “the original hot dog.” But we know that Feltman’s is where it all began.

Brothers

Bring Back

Feltman’s

In 1954, Feltman’s Ocean Pavilion closed down. But in 2016, inspired by his grandpa who was a devoted regular of the Feltman’s establishment, Michael Quinn officially brought back the boardwalk favorite – original recipe and all. Today, along with his brother Joe, Michael is now making it possible for you to enjoy the one, the only, the true original hot dog – Feltman’s of Coney Island.

Brothers from Brooklyn

Since he was a little boy, Feltman’s of Coney Island owner, Michael Quinn, always dreamed of opening a business with his brothers Jimmy and Joe. Mike’s dream came crashing down on September 11, 2001, when his brother Jimmy was killed in the World Trade Center. 15 years later, Mike and his younger brother Joe are realizing that dream by starting a hot dog revolution.

Brothers from Brooklyn

Since he was a little boy, Feltman’s of Coney Island owner, Michael Quinn, always dreamed of opening a business with his brothers Jimmy and Joe. Mike’s dream came crashing down on September 11, 2001, when his brother Jimmy was killed in the World Trade Center. 15 years later, Mike and his younger brother Joe are realizing that dream by starting a hot dog revolution.

2016